• Maggie’s cancer care writing group

    Today was my first session as a shadow to Larry Butler, the facilitator at Maggie’s cancer care writing group taking place on the Gartnavel hospitals campus in Glasgow. I am fortunate that I will be learning by participating and observing the group. We were a new group of ten with a few people returning. Today we got to know each other in a lovely relaxed lounge setting.
    Our first piece of writing was a two-minute write on one of 3 options – I chose the one¬† “Why have I come here?”
    I wrote about¬†¬†me achieving a long-held dream, here in Maggie’s¬†practising therapeutic writing, and feeling privileged to be there. And it’s¬†a great chance to do some writing, –¬†which I love doing.¬† We shared and laughed and later we¬†had a twenty-five minute ‘Owl walk’ , where we all went for a wander of 200 steps exactly. Then our suggested writing prompt was to stop, listen, pay attention and write!
    Here’s some of mine!

    Steps outside

    A garden intervenes

     two rocks sit,

    substantial,  sittable-on,

    ground-hugging ivy is scrawling , scrabbling,

    attaching, garlanding,

    And the fuzzy fizzy fir tree

    is right in my face.

    Seagulls bleat repeatedly

    and the rain spits at me

    occasionally.

    The snowdrops have wearied;

    their heads wrinkled and brown.

    Their spring has passed;

    will come again.

  • Words Work Well

     

    Lapidus Scotland and NHS Education for Scotland make Words Work Well!

    13th March 2015- the launch of our new bibliotherapy toolkit marks the progress made by this network of librarians, bibliotherapists, writers, storytellers and readers over the past few years. The toolkit was launched as a pilot online toolkit – it will keep growing as practitioners add new creative writing prompts, as readers add new sessions on poetry or fiction. It has contributions from people who lead groups in activities across Scotland.

    Sir Kenneth Calman wrote the foreword for us and each contribution has a distinct flavour.

    Humans tell stories;

    humans listen to the stories of others;

    one story whether heard or read often prompts another story;

    comforting.

    Stories, such as the stories of prisoners in Stewart Ennis’ writing group in a maximum security prison wing.

    “I teach prisoners of all ages from 20 to 60 years old. Some are coming to the end of a lengthy sentence, while others have only just begun to come to terms with a sentence of 30 years or more, and of an age where it is highly unlikely they will leave prison alive.”