• Wee Read Moves Town!

    After weeks of packing and moving we are settled back into Glasgow, at Scotstounhill. Our links with Lanarkshire will remain strong, and in fact our See Me Champion, Christine has just given a talk at the Lanarkshire Recovery Network conference on Friday 18th November.We look forward to widening our work towards the West and the rest of Scotland.Goodbye Hamilton, thanks for all the inspiration!

    Working with our Lanark writing group continues, and we had a day outing to the national Museum of Scotland last month. It was so enjoyable, that we want to go again! Another trip to a pantomime has been discussed, as some members have never been to one!We will be reading our poems and talking to folks at the Stonehouse Hope Cafe xmas event.The group there with Adrian is growing from strength to strength.

    This week, our Maggie’s writer will be hosting a stall at the festive fayre selling books and other items to raise funds for a publication of the groups’ poems and writings.

    So, it’s all go!The autumn and now, the start of winter has come upon us and we sit witnessing change every day.

    Change is a big theme in our work.This week, our board will meet to review our last year, and to plan the year ahead. We have 4 new volunteers, which is a fantastic achievement. We look forward to a co-design and co-production approach for leading our services.

    Christine is also working for Lapidus, The Writing for Wellbeing Organization as Digital Editor.This broadens the reach, and creates new connections across our borders.

    I will leave you with one of my own poems, written a few years ago while I was in Hamilton. Dedicated to my brother Ian who helps us on this website, thanks Ian!

    All Was Silent

    All was silent.

    Many lives lost for words,

    til many years after,

    I say

    ma Granda died at 31;

    a miner, a heart attack,

    ma Daddy a week old.

    Seventh son

    no father knew.

    His seventh son

    inherits true.

    All was silent.

    Many years lost for words,

    til many years after,

    I say

    Ma Daddy died at 51;

    a steel worker, a heart attack,

    ma brother 4 years old.

    Til after many years I say,

    I’d cry until ma bones ran dry.

    Unutterable loss of my favourite guy.

    No longer silent,

    words speak at last,

    To Ian I say,

    sometimes love has no words to mark its’ day.

    C. Cather

  • Exciting training events all over Scotland!

    Words Work Well Training in Bibliotherapy

    Lapidus Scotland invites you to Bibliotherapy Trainings Scotland-Wide during June 2016. Participants will learn about leading therapeutic creative reading and writing sessions for individuals and groups in various settings. Training will also refer to Lapidus’ website http://wordsworkwellscotland.co.uk/ – a bibliotherapy toolkit for facilitators.

    Poems, images and conversation in creative communication with people who have dementia
    Facilitator Paula Jennings. 2- 5pm, 6th June, Conference Room, Central Library, The Wellgate, Dundee DD1 1DB. With input from library staff on the Dementia Library. click here to book

    An Introduction to Bibliotherapy for Writers and Storytellers
    Facilitators Larry Butler and Valerie Gillies. 10am – 4pm, 8th June, Storytelling Centre, 43-45 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1SR.
    click here to book

    Choosing Reading Material and Facilitating an Expressive Writing Group
    Facilitators Jayne Wilding and Maureen Sangster. 2pm – 5.30pm, 13th June, Kirkcaldy Galleries, Abbotshall Road, Kirkcaldy, KY1 1YG. Click here to book

    Treasures in the Chest & Lifelines
    Facilitators Mandy Haggith and Margot Henderson. 10 – 2pm, 18th June, The Spectrum Centre, 1 Margaret Street, Inverness IV1 1LS.  click here to book

    How Reading Informs Writing
    Facilitator Helen Lamb. 1.30 – 4pm, 20th June, The Glasgow Women’s Library, 23 Landressy Street, Glasgow G40 1B.
    Click here to book

    Strengthening Facilitators’ Skills
    Facilitator Liz Niven. 1.30 – 4pm, 23rd June at University of Glasgow, Rutherford McCowan Building,
    Room R127, Crichton Campus, Dumfries DG1 4ZL. Includes informal time for questions and networking.
    Click here to book

    This development opportunity in creative facilitation is for those that work in health and social care settings, mental health centres, prisons, libraries, in education and community arts. It will also appeal to storytellers, writers and those promoting staff well- being in workplaces.  All are welcome, those experienced in facilitation and those new to the experience.
    Cost £25 for day long training: £10 for half a day plus Eventbrite booking fee.

     

    Lapidus is supported by Awards for All Scotland, Creative Scotland and Scottish Book Trust’s Live Literature Fund
  • What is bibliotherapy?

    Some people have different views but my understanding is that the word and concept of bibliotherapy is like an umbrella concept– that covers a range of meanings. In psychology it is used for cognitive behavioural therapy using self-help books and discussion with a therapist. The Latin roots of biblio- book or text- and therapy – well, therapy, are quite broad.

    Many librarians in health and public libraries are adding to the existing service of self-help or books on prescription services, by giving book chats or reading group services, like Wee read offers.

    In my research I learned the various models of bibliotherapy from Debbie Hicks, I took her idea of creative bibliotherapy and ran with it. Reading from imaginative literature, fiction and poetry are the basis. I write as well as read and that makes it all the better, I think.Research in this area continues apace, here is a link to work at Oxford Brookes University

    Librarians are very keen on creative bibliotherapy, and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals has done a lot to support it. Here, in a blog by Julie Walker of Kirklees libraries, a common use of the term bibliotherapy is explained, using fiction and poetry for wellbeing or therapeutic purposes. here description of this group work with public libraries is very informative and she recommends using a  toolkit- so the Lapidus and NHS Education Words Work Well bibliotherapy toolkit is definitely a useful resource.

    The Network is a group for library and other workers aiming to tackle social exclusion. Creative bibliotherapy in groups is one way of doing this- inviting folk in to a wee read, for a chat about whatever poems or stories are appropriate that day. I have been known to say, I can do bibliotherapy with a bus ticket! Well, there’s a story there about a journey, link to memories of others’ journeys- there’s a book chat for you!